Hamilton Home Review, February 2018 Edition

We’ve re-launched Hamilton Home Review, this time focusing on investors, especially those who are members of Venture Property Investments. I have been acting as the RE Liaison with Martin and Chris of Venture for about a year now and this is how we keep in touch with our clients, new members, and past owners.

If you click this link, it will take you to the February edition

If you click this link, it will take you to the most recent edition


Just what is a full English breakfast?

In the middle of New York Fried, Artichoke Hart is asked to prepare a full English breakfast for the visiting British dignitaries. It never happens because the British leave the party early but they had stayed, this is the recipe he would have used: (From one of my followers, “WishtoDish”)

click here for the recipe and to meet “WishtoDish”


Fish Tacos with Secret Sauce

So simple it’s ridiculous. Which begs the question “How can restaurants charge $13-15 for a dish that you can easily make yourself for a fraction of that price?”. Of course, we could gourmet it up by making our own “secret” sauce but why bother; the restaurants don’t. A good dill and lemon sauce (found in the fish dept) commonly used for salmon, is perfect as the flavouring for a yogurt-based sauce.
I’m not sure we’ll order this again in a restaurant; it simply costs too much for what it is. But man does it taste good!


2 frozen haddock filets
4 soft tortillas
egg and panko breadcrumbs
Carrot, sliced into thin strips
Lettuce, sliced into thin strips
Spinach, sliced into thin strips,
red pepper, sliced into thin strips
scallions, sliced
2 tbsns dill and lemon dressing
1 tbsn plain greek yogurt
2 tbsns tarter sauce
2 cocktail tomatoes, sliced and diced into pieces
1″ strip of feta cheese (greek style) crumbled


Thaw filets slightly (in order to cut in half), roll in egg, then breadcrumbs. Place in oven at 400 for 20 minutes. For the last 4 minutes, place the tortillas, wrapped in tin foil, in the oven.

Meanwhile, cut the carrot, lettuce, spinach, red pepper into thin strips.

When heated, lay out the tortillas and spread 1 tbsn each of tarter sauce along centre of each. Place cooked filet in centre. Top with all the strips, tomatoes and feta, and place in serving racks.

Heat up the dressing and yogurt gently to prevent curdling, add pepper to taste.

Pour “secret” sauce over tacos and serve with a salad.

Major lenders hike rates following Bank of Canada decision

Businessman presenting chart

Canada’s major banks have been quick to react to the Bank of Canada’s decision to raise interest rates to 1.25%.

CIBC, RBC, Scotiabank and TD were among the first lenders to increase their prime lending rates by 25 basis points to 3.45%; the new rates take effect from today (Jan 18) more

Turkey scallopini in lemon sauce

This dish was inspired by our new friend, Chef Massimo Zingaro Fidale, on our recent visit to Italy. His simple but oh-so-delicious Veal Scallopini in Lemon Sauce was so tasty I couldn’t stop thinking about it.

However, as usual, I changed it; Canadianized it if you will. In my version, I use turkey scallopini and make the sauce a little heavier with the introduction of Greek yogurt. I also add a little twist with the use of Limoncello (brought home from Italy).  ‘Twas a totally new and mouth-watering experience.


4 strips turkey scallopini
4 slices back bacon (pork loin)
2 tbsn sesame seed oil
2 tbsn plain greek yogurt
4 tbsn lemon juice
2 tbsn limoncello
1 tbsn capers (dried)
1/2 tsp fresh oregano (1/4 dried)
pepper to taste


Brush turkey strips with lemon and saute over low heat in sesame seed oil, till browned both sides and white inside (about 4 min per side) then add the lemon and simmer for 5 minutes. Turn off heat and cover.

Simultaneously saute the back bacon to desired crispness. Don’t burn as it will alter the taste of the dish immensely.

While these are cooking, slowly begin heating the yogurt and (very slowly) pour in the limoncello. It may curdle but keep mixing. Add the capers, oregano, and pepper.

Place turkey in centre of plate and pour remaining lemon juice over them. Then pour the sauce on top.

I served with roasted garlic potatoes and thin slices of fresh tomatoes from our garden.

This and other recipes occasionally pop up in the Artichoke Hart series (available here), or the London Cartwright series (available here). Both chefs are fictional… the dishes are not.


Veal with Olives and Grape Tomatoes

At this time of the year, I get an abundance of small grape tomatoes. They are delicious as a snack but I get so many, I have to think of dishes to prepare with them. (The larger tomatoes don’t ripen till late in August here).

This is one I hadn’t tried before and since we were in the mood for a little meat, worked out really well. The topping alone would be good on any meat.


2 tbsp flour
1/4 tsp each salt and pepper
4 slices of top round of veal for scallopini
2 tsp oil
1/2 cup dry white wine
2 tbsp cold butter
1 cup grape tomatoes (halved)
1/3 cup pitted kalamata olives (halved)
1/3 cup chopped parsley (fresh if possible; less if dried)


Mix flour, salt and pepper in a large plastic food bag. Add veal, 1 piece at a time, and toss to coat.

Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add veal and cook 4-5 minutes, turning once, until golden (center should be opaque). Remove to a warm plate.

Add wine to skillet; simmer 1 minute. Reduce heat to very low. Stir in butter until melted, then the tomatoes, olives and parsley. Spoon over cutlets.

I served with sauteed carrots and roasted small potatoes in rosemary.

This and other recipes occasionally pop up in the Artichoke Hart series (available here), or the London Cartwright series (available here). Both chefs are fictional… the dishes are not.


Honey roasted Rhubarb, Walnut, rocket and Feta Salad

When fresh Rhubarb arrives, my cooking brain insists that I make something. Since I’m not much of a dessert eater (I know, hard to believe from a cook), I look for side plates, appetizers, cocktail accompaniments, etc. This one is a true marvel since the honey, thyme and feta offset the sharp tangy taste of the rhubarb.


2 stalks rhubarb
1 tbsp honey
1 tspn fresh thyme (you should have fresh available but 1/2 tspn dried works)
1/2 cup walnut pieces
1 small bag of mixed rocket and spinach leaves (I pull my leaves right of the Arugula plant in the yard)
1 small fennell bulb
1 tbsp balsamic vinegar
1 tbsp extra virgin lemon olive oil (or regular extra-virgin with a dash of lemon juice, if you don’t have it)
salt and pepper
2 tbsn feta cheese (the Greek version, not Canadian. As my son-in-law the Greek pointed out: “The difference is like night and day”


Preheat oven to 200%
Cut the rhubarb into 3cm batons and lay on an oven tray. Drizzle with honey and thyme, and give it a mix around so the rhubarb is well coated. Bake for 6 minutes or until they are soft enough to bite. Sprinkle with walnuts, place tray back in the oven for 2 minutes.

Meanwhile, mix the balsamic vinegar with olive oil and season with salt and pepper.

Thinly slice the fennel and toss with the rocket and spinach leaves, add the salad dressing, then toss again.

To plate, place salad on the bottom, crumble feta cheese on top, gently place rhubarb on top and sprinkle withe the toasted walnuts.

This and other recipes occasionally pop up in the Artichoke Hart series (available here), or the London Cartwright series (available here). Both chefs are fictional… the dishes are not.